The Botanicals We Use

Juniper Berries

Juniper Berries

juniperus communis

The juniper berry gives gin its distinctive clean, sharp taste, and traditionally, this should be the predominant flavour of a gin. It's actually a cone rather than a berry, with seeds inside a fleshy exterior. Gin gets its name from the Dutch jenever, meaning ‘juniper’. It’s thought to be a treatment for stomach ache - reason enough for another G&T.

 

Coriander Seeds

Coriander Seeds

coriandrum sativum

The seeds of the coriander plant have a warm, spicy citrus flavour.
They are rich in alpha-pinene, which also gives juniper its ‘piney’ taste.
After juniper, this is a most important ingredient in the distiller’s toolkit, and is found in most gins.

 

Gentian Root

Gentian Root

gentiana

Gentian root is a herb originally grown in the Himalayas, and,
traditionally, is used to treat all manner of digestive troubles.
It's incredibly bitter to taste - in fact, it's a key ingredient in many recipes
for bitters - and is used sparingly in our gins as a counterbalance to
our florals.

 

Green Cardamom Pods

Green Cardamom Pods

elettaria cardamomum

The plant producing these little flavour-packed pods is part of the ginger family. The key ingredient of Hotham's Cardamom Gin, the green pods give our gin its piquant, perfumed flavour, and is akin to eucalyptus, with a citrus twist. Cardamom is one of the most expensive spices in the world, and comes third to saffron and vanilla. It's believed to be an effective stress reliever - no wonder a Hotham's Cardamom Gin is so welcome after a day at work!

 

Lavender

Lavender

lavandula angustifolia

A botanical which should be used sparingly to avoid a ‘soapy’ taste, lavender softens the piney flavours of juniper and coriander. It gives a dry, flowery scent to gin and helps to enhance the herbal tones of other botanicals.
Lavender is traditionally used to cure headaches and aid sleep - try a flower or two in your Hotham's nightcap.

 

Orris Root

Orris Root

iris pallida

The root of the iris plant, orris has a smell much like Parma violets.
It's used in gin not just for this dusty, floral taste, but also as a binder,
fixing the flavours of all the botanicals in the Distiller’s blend.
It's a botanical you can almost ‘feel’ in your mouth and
lends depth to our gins.

 

Pink Peppercorns

Pink Peppercornsschinus molle

The pink peppercorn is actually a member of the cashew nut family, native to South America. It is another botanical rich in pinene, making a perfect complement to juniper. It has a fruity, spicy flavour, and the berries look great as a garnish for your gin.

 

Rose Petals

Rose Petalsrosa centifolia

Adding a floral scent and taste, rose petals can overpower some of gin’s subtler flavours. In the right quantity, though, the fragrant pink petals can suggest a Turkish Delight taste, and they pair well with cardamom, another of our key ingredients. They make a beautiful and aromatic garnish for your glass of Hotham’s Handcrafted Gin.